Busta Rhymes Mini-Doc: Life & Rhymes [EXPLICIT]


[MUSIC PLAYING] BUSTA RHYMES: Hold up,
hold up, hold up. Hold up. They trying to kick
us out of here. I ain’t ready to
fucking leave. [CROWD CHEERS] BUSTA RHYMES: They think they
going to make us leave without doing a classic? Fuck that! Fuck that! [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“PUT YOUR HANDS WHERE MY EYES COULD SEE”] Q-TIP: His drive is
just impeccable. He just has a great drive. He’s a great businessman. And he loves it. PHIFE: He has dope albums. He has a better stage
show than most. And his cadences, different
flows, and energy are second to none. SPLIFF STAR: He always trying
outdo the last thing he did, and always looking for
perfection, and to me, that’s a genius. DJ SCRATCHATOR: Busta’s energy
is like no other. When he gets on that stage,
he commands respect. The aggressiveness
is like no other. And, of course, his lyrical game
is superb just as well. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“DANGEROUS”] J-DOE: Busta’s one of the last
people, I think, in this game, that really still gets excited
about music like it’s the first time hearing it. Like when he hears a beat
that he likes, it’s like unmatchable excitement for
hearing that beat, and his desire to want to get on
that and rap on it. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“DANGEROUS”] [APPLAUSE] BUSTA RHYMES: You know, I always
felt like I wanted to do music before I had the
opportunity to do it. Being 9, 10, 12 years old,
listening to Africa Islam and Red Alert on WHBI, as a college
station, from 2:00 to 5:00 in the morning. I used to do pause tapes of
their shows, of the live battles between Cold Crush
Brothers and the Force MDs, who were at that time known
as the Force MCs. And I would go to school and lie
to my friends like I was actually at these battles in
person, knowing damn well I wasn’t old enough
to be up past 9 o’clock on a school night. I was so caught up in my
imagination of living that experience that I never
even allowed myself to tap out of that. I was actually claiming
the divine. I was saying that I’m going to
be that dude one day, and nobody can’t tell me shit. Like I don’t care if
I sound crazy. I don’t care if I look crazy. I don’t care if I feel crazy. I’m pretty much married
to this idea. [MUSIC PLAYING] PHIFE: The birthplace of hip hop
is really the Bronx, but New York is New York. It’s home for hip hop. SADAT X: You know, we was the
forerunners of it, you know what I’m saying? It was new. Rap was fairly new, and
New York was on the forefront of that. [MUSIC – RUN-DMC,
“PETER PIPER”] CHARLIE BROWN: There’s a long
list of great artists that came out in the ’80s that laid
the foundation for the groups in the ’90s. Back in ’85, ’86, you had
Run-DMC, Beastie Boys, along with Whodini and LL Cool J.
You know, basically Rush Management artists, you
know what I’m saying? A lot of Def Jam artists
that were coming out. And it was an opportunity for
a lot of black people to get money, you know what
I’m saying? A lot of black youth struggled,
you know what I’m saying, in the ghettos
of New York City to put out their music. And there was a lot of
independent record labels. Everybody’s approach
was original. And it definitely paid off that
people were putting out unique sounds and having
fun with it. It was just a great feeling, you
know what I’m saying, to be a part of music history
and laying the lineage of hip hop culture. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“GIMME SOME MORE”] SPLIFF STAR: First time I heard
Busta Rhymes rap, he was, like, maybe 12,
13 years old. And he would do like a– it was a rap slash little
reggae, and his name was Chirpy Ruff. Busta was drumming when
he was a kid. He was break dancing with
him and his brother Shy. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“GIMME SOME MORE”] BUSTA RHYMES: When I first moved
to Long Island from East Flatbush Brooklyn, I was 12. By 13 or 14, they had this
Basketball Classics event at Nassau Coliseum. In between the games, they would
have these concerts. Dana Dane walked out there with
a big fur coat on and two Alaskan coyotes, or something
like that. They just looked like these
beautiful white coyotes. They wasn’t actual coyotes. They was huskies, like Alaskan
huskies, or something. [MUSIC – DANA DANE,
“CINDERFELLA”] BUSTA RHYMES: His fur coat was
matching the fur on the dogs. And he had his Kangol on, and
his fur on his Kangol was matching his coat and
the fur on the dogs. And that shit just looked
so grand to me. I was just like, wow,
this is what? An idea behind a bowl of cereal,
which was brought about as a result of a blunt
munchie, because he probably smoked a little joint and just
came up with this idea. That concert made me want
it that much more. [MUSIC – DANA DANE,
“CINDERFELLA”] SPLIFF STAR: Busta used to live
out in Brooklyn with his father, and, you know, get into
all kinds of trouble as little guys and stuff. Then they moved him out to
Long Island to his mama. And you know mama
ain’t having it. Mama Green ain’t having it. So she kind of straightened
him out. Over there, he met Charlie
Brown, Dinko, his cousin Milo, and they put a force together,
and they called it Leaders of the New School. [MUSIC – LEADERS OF THE NEW
SCHOOL, “THE INTERNATIONAL ZONE COASTER”] Q-TIP: The first time I heard
Leaders of the New School was the first time I heard them. It was incredible. The Leaders of the New School
is just known for great performances, the interplay
between the emcees, really furious-paced rhymes
and stuff. So they the shit. [MUSIC – LEADERS OF THE NEW
SCHOOL, “THE INTERNATIONAL ZONE COASTER”] PHIFE: They remind me of
what the Cold Crush Brothers was at one time. It was like Cold Crush,
Force MDs, equals Leaders of the New School. They all could emcee. They had their harmony, but then
they’d rip the mic line for line, verse for verse. [MUSIC – LEADERS OF THE NEW
SCHOOL, “THE INTERNATIONAL ZONE COASTER”] CHARLIE BROWN: When I met Busta
Rhymes there in school, he was the first member that I
ended up working with, and this is the second member that
was part of Leaders of the New School, Dinko D, who was also
in school with us back on Jerusalem Avenue in New York,
you know what I’m saying, in Nassau County, LI. DINKO D: And we were all doing
our own separate thing, but Brown brought the group together
and made it work– Leaders of the New School. CHARLIE BROWN: And those are
our roots from 510 South Franklin, with Public
Enemy, because those are our mentors– Chuck D, Flava Flav, the S1Ws,
and Professor Griff, Hank Shockley, and Keith Shockley,
and everybody else down with the PE posse. We got the opportunity to go
into the studio and work with them through a rap contest
that they had at the ACT Theater in Hempstead, and me and
Busta were there, and we didn’t get a chance to rock. DINKO D: Right. CHARLIE BROWN: So we ended up
going to the studio, and they saw me, Dinko, and
Busta together. Busta, he was playing the drums
while I was rhyming, and they was, like, yo, y’all
brothers need to be Leaders of the New School. You know what I mean? And that’s how it started. [MUSIC – LEADERS OF THE NEW
SCHOOL, “CASE OF THE PTA”] BUSTA RHYMES: You know, Chuck
D gave me my name. Chuck D gave us the name Leaders
of the New School. Public Enemy was the number one
shit at the time, and they allowed us the opportunity to
learn what it was to be full package artists. [MUSIC – PUBLIC ENEMY, “REBEL
WITHOUT A PAUSE”] BUSTA RHYMES: They taught us the
understanding of concept– lyrics, attitude, appearance,
music, and performance. There’s no better advice or
guidance that you can get if you’re trying to be in the music
industry, especially when you’re getting it firsthand
from a Chuck D, Hank Shockley, and Flava Flav, and
Eric Vietnam Sadler, and Wizard KG, which is the whole
Bomb Squad crew, in addition to the PE family. [MUSIC – PUBLIC ENEMY,
“PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1”] BUSTA RHYMES: That Public
Enemy thing was something else. They brought theater to the
hip hop performance. You got them S1Ws up there that
didn’t really ever touch a mic outside of Griff. But they had such a significant
role, and these routines in martial arts and
militants, and just power and strength and shit that they
exemplified, it was such a key component to the show. You know, Terminator X being a
key component as a deejay, he just wasn’t a deejay. They made it prominent that
people acknowledged him and his presence. Flav being the proper balance
to the intensity of Chuck D. That whole chemistry, just to
even think, to make sure that all the different emotions that
people deal with were actually on stage for you to
visualize at the same time was some genius shit. And they taught us that. Leaders of the New School put
the first album out in 1991, but we wasn’t fast rapping
at that time. The speed rap thing really
wasn’t happening like that at that time. We were just rhyming to whatever
the tempo of the beats were. But I think energy was something
that was more exemplified in the music,
because we were just groomed to prioritize displaying the
passion through the song. It wasn’t just about rhyming
on the beat. It was about making sure that
your shit touched the soul of the people, touched the
soul of the street. So even if it was a calm record
or a slow record, you would get a performance display
that made the actual slow or medium tempo record feel
like a high-energy record and give people their money’s
worth and their time’s worth. [MUSIC – A TRIBE CALLED QUEST
WITH LEADERS OF THE NEW SCHOOL, “SCENARIO”] CHARLIE BROWN: It was
Q-Tip’s idea to do a record with Leaders. “Scenario” was definitely a big
hit, and it’s definitely a big piece of hip hop culture
coming from the ’90s. PHIFE: Q-Tip had a relationship
with them when Q-Tip used to go to high school
right over here, Murray Bergtraum, and Busta used to go
to high school over here at Westinghouse. [MUSIC – A TRIBE CALLED QUESTION
WITH LEADERS OF THE NEW SCHOOL, “SCENARIO”] CHARLIE BROWN: Q-Tip was
definitely on point with arranging the music. And vocally, we just came to the
table and said, you know, let’s have something
where it’s a collaboration, an effort. PHIFE: Everybody’s writing their
rhymes and so forth, hiding it from each other,
because we want to outdo each other. It was very competitive. DINKO D: Each man, as they wrote
their verse there that day, went into the studio,
and it was like a judge and jury, you know. The rest of the crew would watch
each man come out, and it was like, the reaction
to everybody’s verse was just so, so great. PHIFE: And everybody laid their
verses or said their verses right before they
went in the booth. Busta didn’t say his verse. He just went in the booth. And automatically, we was like,
oh, he’s going last. CHARLIE BROWN: Busta and Q-Tip
got together and put the end of the song together. [MUSIC – A TRIBE CALLED QUEST
WITH LEADERS OF THE NEW SCHOOL, “SCENARIO”] Q-TIP: You know, nowadays,
artists want to be on the front of the record, because
people have ADD and deejays change the record quickly. Back then, it was to close the
record, and we had him close the record. [MUSIC- A TRIBE CALLED QUEST
WITH LEADERS OF THE NEW SCHOOL, “SCENARIO”] PHIFE: Q-tip set him up
perfectly, because it was like he was introducing him
all over again. He’s always been in a class by
himself, hence the reason when he does cameos on records,
he always goes last. Period. Because you know he’s going
to steal the show. I like to call him the James
Brown of hip hop, because there was no getting on
stage after James Brown back in the days. That’s the same thing
with Bus. [MUSIC – A TRIBE CALLED QUEST
WITH LEADERS OF THE NEW SCHOOL, “SCENARIO”] PHIFE: Leaders of the New School
were doing an interview for MTV, and all hell broke
loose, pretty much. We were in Vermont or something
like that, and Busta had called us to let us know
that Leaders was going to break up or whatever. So he was in limbo as far as
what he was going to do. Because to be honest, he was
made to be a solo artist. At least that’s how it seems. But he never really
wanted to go solo. He really loved his group. We were kind of going
through our little growing pains as well. But theirs was out of control
by that time. SPLIFF STAR: He just
was different from the rest of them. He always painted his pictures
with bright colors. And no matter who was rapping
on that track, Busta would stand out. He just had that star quality. DJ SCRATCHATOR: Beginning of
1996, “The Coming” album, that was when everything started. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“EVERYTHING REMAINS RAW”] SPLIFF STAR: I remember when I
first heard “Put Your Hands Where My Eyes Could See,” I knew
it was going to be a huge record off top. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“PUT YOUR HANDS WHERE MY EYES COULD SEE”] [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“DANGEROUS”] [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“GET OUT”] [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“BREAK YA NECK”] SPLIFF STAR: “Break
Ya Neck.” Whoa. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“BREAK YA NECK”] [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES, “I
KNOW WHAT YOU WANT”] [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“TOUCH IT”] [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“ARAB MONEY”] BUSTA RHYMES: You know, I was
always told that you’re one hit record away from a
successful career, but I never really believed in that. Because nowadays, one hit record
alone doesn’t make people believe in you enough. They got to see some things that
turns them into believers and makes them wholehearted
fans. I think something shifted
dynamically when “Look At Me Now” came out. Just the way my kids and just
the kids in general embraced that record, it kind of
re-introduced Busta Rhymes to the new generation. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“LOOK AT ME NOW”] BUSTA RHYMES: That rapid flow
style of emceeing or rhyming was something that I’ve
always done for years. The first time I actually did it
on a record was on an album by my group Leaders of the New
School that we put out in 1992 called “Daily Reminder.” As time
passed, I just got better with doing it. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“DAILY REMINDER”] BUSTA RHYMES: The
kids loved it. The people love it. They always find it extremely
amazing when they see me do it live because they can’t
believe that I’m actually doing it. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“WHY STOP NOW”] BUSTA RHYMES: My ability to be
able to articulate so clearly even at a pace like that is
something that I think that the kids damn near turned
into a game. [RAP BY UNKNOWN RAPPER] BUSTA RHYMES: Woooh! [UNKNOWN RAPPER] Easy. [LAUGHTER] BUSTA RHYMES: It just became
such a challenge for them to be able to do it, try to learn
the verse and post their own rendition of the verse on
YouTube, and just the views that the video got,
it was just crazy. It’s not surprising to me that
artists from 20 years ago are back in the forefront, because
a lot of artists that are in the forefront now that was
around from 20 years ago, they were never not in the forefront,
because it’s usually hard to come back once
you lose it altogether. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES, J DOE, &
REEK DA VILLAIN, “KING TUT”] REEK DA VILLAIN: Me, Doe,
and Bus, we were in the studio together. He pulled up a Jahlil beat, and
we just started writing, and we worked on a hook. And first it was “Brink’s
Truck,” but then somebody else put something out using Brink’s
trucks, so that’s how we eventually came up with “King
Tut.” You know, Bus is known for all the crazy jewelry,
so it just fit. You know what I’m saying? And we kings, you know? So, it was the right thing. BUSTA RHYMES: I look fucking
like King Tut. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES, J DOE, &
REEK DA VILLAIN, “KING TUT”] SPLIFF STAR: Busta had his own
sound, his own chemistry within himself, he knew what he
wanted to do, and he never backs down from it. So if you’re going to work for
Busta and you don’t come prepared understanding what he
wants to accomplish, you might lose your job right away. Straight up. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES, J DOE, &
REEK DA VILLAIN, “KING TUT”] BUSTA RHYMES: Even the new dudes
understood that in doing a record with Busta Rhymes or
for Busta Rhymes, it has to meet a certain standard. Because I ain’t just trying
to do what’s cool. I’m trying to do what’s
groundbreaking. J-DOE: Overall, in hip hop in
general, I don’t believe there’s anyone else that’s
stayed relevant this long in the game, who’s done as many
albums as he’s done, and stayed at this level
of success. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“STOP THE PARTY”] DJ SCRATCHATOR: His consistency makes him relevant. You know, that fact that he’s
able to adapt to the new styles, the new environment, his
lyrical content, the fact that he can keep up with the
youngest and the best. SPLIFF STAR: The new album? It’s the release
of the dragon. That’s all I’m going to say. It’s the release
of the dragon. The new album? Forget about it. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“PRESSURE”] SPLIFF STAR: I don’t know. This guy don’t want to stop. He’s not going to stop. I don’t think it was meant
for him to stop. [MUSIC – BUSTA RHYMES,
“HOLLA”] BUSTA RHYMES: You know, the one
lesson that I’ve learned the most was to always strive
for perfection, as much as perfection probably isn’t
something that’s accomplishable. And never allow any one thing,
or any many things, to get in the way of you allowing
yourself to secure your own win. It’s always about securing
your win. And in the process of securing
the win, you got to also understand what it is
to embrace loss. I’m a strong believer of doing
what you put your mind to and allowing watching it come to
fruition in a very real, tangible way. That’s how it pretty much
always worked for me. If you hot, you setting a
standard, you cutting edge, you groundbreaking, you setting
new trends, you become a part of pop culture. You become those things that
people want to be like. It’s just deeper than just
loving your music. They want to be like you. [MUSIC – CHRIS BROWN & BUSTA
RHYMES, “LOOK AT ME NOW”] [CHEERING] BUSTA RHYMES: I think y’all
should make more noise than that right there. [CHEERING] BUSTA RHYMES: How it’s
done in the studio, it’s done on stage. MALE SPEAKER: What y’all
gonna go now? BUSTA RHYMES: How it is– How it’s done in the studio,
it’s done on stage.

100 thoughts on “Busta Rhymes Mini-Doc: Life & Rhymes [EXPLICIT]

  1. Busta Rhymes…hands-down: one of the ILLEST and most ground-breaking emcees to ever bless the mic, and grace the world of Hip-Hop, bar none…!!

    Salute, to a living legend…

  2. this video probably holds the record for the use of the word nigga within a 20 min span.

  3. man, i hope everyone watching this realizes this history being shown and the pureness of the art form! love it!!! love it!! love it!!

  4. This is veeeery nice! But tell me now… How This Person after all he said in here could release such an album like BOMBS and make such a stupid features with young not gifted and now be on YMCM !?!?!?!?!?! He was always cool but now I don't even know what to think. It's not a new invention of sound.

  5. Good point…sold out for chips…he's desperate for money to up hold an image…fake ballen..like Cash Money Millionaires in bankruptcy…T.I.M.E…classic DOPE…

  6. Busta is still the leader of the new school by proving that geatness always rises to the top…even in hip-hop

  7. wicked…i think he need to do a song with jungle rock jr aka chip fu…one of the illest also….those dudes on record will kill the game! i put money on it!!!

  8. He is a rap legend, but he stopped being good at this 12 years ago. Now he works with fucking gucci mane and shit. Long live his older stuff !

  9. True pioneer to hip-hop! His passion for his music is untouchable!! Busta is one of the greatest!

  10. Busta Rhymes do be commanding respect and he's earned it. He definitely did.

  11. It's a shame cats want to be relevant to children. Why would someone want to be relevant to a kid??? KIDS KNOW NOTHING! Plus you can make more money pushing your craft to adults since there are MORE adults and they make MORE MONEY and they will SPEND their cash if you put out quality. So I'm down with Busta … but he needs to stick to his base. When children grow up, they'll see his talent. Until then, Buss, don't neglect the majority of the population.

  12. it's not available in germany yet, google play I mean, so busta, please make it available for us germans as well. ; )

  13. When you love what you do, you can never go wrong. Busta is def one of the greats

  14. A pleasure to see one of the hip hop icons of the golden era still getting busy with the mic in his hand.

  15. Busta Rhymes represents real.There will not be another mc this unique.Hes trully blessed.

  16. i have seen many artists live: run dmc, public enemy, cypress hill, wu-tang, fugees, eminem, d-12, de la soul, rza, wyclef etc. BUT busta and spliff delivered the illest concert i have ever seen!

  17. I am not Buying the BS. It is Pop Beiber shit. The Tracks where he is real is respectable, the BS that is BS is Fucking BS

  18. I hear the track I produced for Leaders of the New School, "The End is Near" at 6:50!

  19. That Brooklyn Bodega show was AWESOME. Most of the live footage and interviews was taken there. Check it out here: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL380434361AE76D4B

  20. Holy shit my dick hurts

    what do you say you have a couple of go for it go for it go for it hoooortnz at a holchamp

    OH GOD I HOPE THING SWORK OUT kind of working out

  21. Busta Rhymes is a kind of guy that you wish he lived in your hood who would tease you and teach you what parents don't 

  22. Busta is a mothafuckin legend yall just haven't realized it yet until he's gone.  He's one of my top five hip hop artist.

  23. I like music bad but it better wen you can hear it blessing injoy the play google love all tracyscott

  24. Love Phife's (may he rest in peace) explanation why Busta's bars always have to come last, cause he's stealing everybodies show…… except for the song "60 second assassin" 🙂 Spoilers: He went first on the song, fucking nailed it and everything after him sounded sub par. Busta is fucking amazing!

  25. It's like, when those guys were naming the individual rappers in the Leaders of the New School, they screwed over the guys from the get-go, from solo success, who were not named Busta Rhymes! Like, the name Charlie Brown is already taken by the cartoon character and is not unique, and Dinco D is kind of cool but kind of sounds funny (like "little D").

  26. busta is one of my favorite rappers of all time. but krayzie bone from bone thugs n harmony is the fastest rapper of all time.

  27. Only watched this to see if LOTNS was mentioned – was not disappointed, can't believe they got C Brown/Dinco on here. Even Sadat X.

    And damn Phife sounds different in every video – he only sounded like his old self here.

  28. Some people don't understand, some people don't understand / the inner soul that's coming from the inner minds eye – let me tell ya again! I rocks "t.i.m.e" til this day!

  29. BustaRhymes is the Definition of Mc, his energy, attitude 'n skills are something beyond expections… Only carismatic people with a real strong passion for thr groove, beats and Music can relate!! Philippines, Ghana and Italy respect you!

    TheConglomerate AkaBustaRhymes..God Bless!!
    Saluute!!

    #Genesis #BigBang #FlipmodeBitches

  30. Busta is flow King! Busta is flex king! Busta Rhymes, Eminem and Snoop Dog. My top 3 rappers ever.

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