Charlton Heston Mark Antony speech “Julius Caesar” (1970)


He says, for Brutus’ sake,
He finds himself beholding to us all. Fourth Citizen
‘Twere best he speak no harm of Brutus here. First Citizen
This Caesar was a tyrant. Third Citizen
Nay, that’s certain: We are blest that Rome is rid of him. Second Citizen
Peace! let us hear what Antony can say. ANTONY
You gentle Romans,– Citizens
Peace, ho! let us hear him. ANTONY
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones; So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious: If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answer’d it. Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest–
For Brutus is an honourable man; So are they all, all honourable men–
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral. He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
But Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath
wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition? Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And, sure, he is an honourable man. I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once, not without cause:
What cause withholds you then, to mourn for him?
O judgment! thou art fled to brutish beasts, And men have lost their reason. Bear with
me; My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me. First Citizen
Methinks there is much reason in his sayings. Second Citizen
If thou consider rightly of the matter, Caesar has had great wrong. Third Citizen
Has he, masters? I fear there will a worse come in his place. Fourth Citizen
Mark’d ye his words? He would not take the crown;
Therefore ’tis certain he was not ambitious. First Citizen
If it be found so, some will dear abide it. Second Citizen
Poor soul! his eyes are red as fire with weeping. Third Citizen
There’s not a nobler man in Rome than Antony. Fourth Citizen
Now mark him, he begins again to speak. ANTONY
But yesterday the word of Caesar might Have stood against the world; now lies he
there. And none so poor to do him reverence.
O masters, if I were disposed to stir Your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage,
I should do Brutus wrong, and Cassius wrong, Who, you all know, are honourable men:
I will not do them wrong; I rather choose To wrong the dead, to wrong myself and you,
Than I will wrong such honourable men. But here’s a parchment with the seal of Caesar;
I found it in his closet, ’tis his will: Let but the commons hear this testament–
Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read– And they would go and kiss dead Caesar’s wounds
And dip their napkins in his sacred blood, Yea, beg a hair of him for memory,
And, dying, mention it within their wills, Bequeathing it as a rich legacy
Unto their issue. Fourth Citizen
We’ll hear the will: read it, Mark Antony. All
The will, the will! we will hear Caesar’s will. ANTONY
Have patience, gentle friends, I must not read it;
It is not meet you know how Caesar loved you. You are not wood, you are not stones, but
men; And, being men, bearing the will of Caesar,
It will inflame you, it will make you mad: ‘Tis good you know not that you are his heirs;
For, if you should, O, what would come of it! Fourth Citizen
Read the will; we’ll hear it, Antony; You shall read us the will, Caesar’s will. ANTONY
Will you be patient? will you stay awhile? I have o’ershot myself to tell you of it:
I fear I wrong the honourable men Whose daggers have stabb’d Caesar; I do fear
it. Fourth Citizen
They were traitors: honourable men! All
The will! the testament! Second Citizen
They were villains, murderers: the will! read the will. ANTONY
You will compel me, then, to read the will? Then make a ring about the corpse of Caesar,
And let me show you him that made the will. Shall I descend? and will you give me leave? Several Citizens
Come down. Second Citizen
Descend. Third Citizen
You shall have leave. ANTONY comes down
Fourth Citizen A ring; stand round. First Citizen
Stand from the hearse, stand from the body. Second Citizen
Room for Antony, most noble Antony. ANTONY
Nay, press not so upon me; stand far off. Several Citizens
Stand back; room; bear back. ANTONY
If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle: I remember
The first time ever Caesar put it on; ‘Twas on a summer’s evening, in his tent,
That day he overcame the Nervii: Look, in this place ran Cassius’ dagger through:
See what a rent the envious Casca made: Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb’d;
And as he pluck’d his cursed steel away, Mark how the blood of Caesar follow’d it,
As rushing out of doors, to be resolved If Brutus so unkindly knock’d, or no;
For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar’s angel: Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved
him! This was the most unkindest cut of all;
For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors’ arms,
Quite vanquish’d him: then burst his mighty heart;
And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey’s statua,
Which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell.
O, what a fall was there, my countrymen! Then I, and you, and all of us fell down,
Whilst bloody treason flourish’d over us. O, now you weep; and, I perceive, you feel
The dint of pity: these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold
Our Caesar’s vesture wounded? Look you here, Here is himself, marr’d, as you see, with
traitors. First Citizen
O piteous spectacle! Second Citizen
O noble Caesar! Third Citizen
O woful day! Fourth Citizen
O traitors, villains! First Citizen
O most bloody sight! Second Citizen
We will be revenged. All
Revenge! About! Seek! Burn! Fire! Kill! Slay! Let not a traitor live! ANTONY
Stay, countrymen. First Citizen
Peace there! hear the noble Antony. Second Citizen
We’ll hear him, we’ll follow him, we’ll die with him. ANTONY
Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up
To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable:
What private griefs they have, alas, I know not,
That made them do it: they are wise and honourable, And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you.
I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is;
But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend; and that they know full
well That gave me public leave to speak of him:
For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech,
To stir men’s blood: I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know;
Show you sweet Caesar’s wounds, poor poor dumb mouths,
And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony
Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue In every wound of Caesar that should move
The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny. All
We’ll mutiny. First Citizen
We’ll burn the house of Brutus. Third Citizen
Away, then! come, seek the conspirators. ANTONY
Yet hear me, countrymen; yet hear me speak. All
Peace, ho! Hear Antony. Most noble Antony! ANTONY
Why, friends, you go to do you know not what: Wherein hath Caesar thus deserved your loves?
Alas, you know not: I must tell you then: You have forgot the will I told you of. All
Most true. The will! Let’s stay and hear the will. ANTONY
Here is the will, and under Caesar’s seal. To every Roman citizen he gives,
To every several man, seventy-five drachmas. Second Citizen
Most noble Caesar! We’ll revenge his death. Third Citizen
O royal Caesar! ANTONY
Hear me with patience. All
Peace, ho! ANTONY
Moreover, he hath left you all his walks, His private arbours and new-planted orchards,
On this side Tiber; he hath left them you, And to your heirs for ever, common pleasures,
To walk abroad, and recreate yourselves. Here was a Caesar! when comes such another? First Citizen
Never, never. Come, away, away! We’ll burn his body in the holy place,
And with the brands fire the traitors’ houses. Take up the body.

100 thoughts on “Charlton Heston Mark Antony speech “Julius Caesar” (1970)

  1. Caesar, thy butt doth smell of demons crawled out of hell. The dream of Rome is blood. 'Alas, you know not.'

  2. Hollywood should turn more to real actors again. Imagine a Shakespeare film today with the hot Hollywood film actors.

  3. That's why I like about Shakespeare: you can have such a wide variety of subtle nuances in interpretation, that the same text feels very different depending on the artists.

  4. He pulls this off well I think. Shame about Robards though, he's awful in this.

  5. Heston is the greatest Mark Anthony in my opinion, but the actor from HBO's Rome is also very good, as fantastic as Brando is, I can't see anyone but Brando.

  6. Thanks for posting this brilliant scene, Heston had the gravitas to do the part, he comes across as persuasive to the audience.

  7. If I didn't know anything about history, I'd think Antony was being a tad sarcastic while calling Brutus an "honorable man".

  8. Friends , roman countrymen… and we will present all of it by only have 5 days to memorize:).im fine btchs sry.

  9. I knew had done this movie, but I had never seen it until now. It's a commanding performance, overshadowing's Brando. I have a question, those subtitles in of I believe to be old english, are a DVD option?

  10. That was powerful when he's said " you all did love him once not without cause..what cause withholds you than to mourn for him ? "

  11. After the U S REPUBLICAN SENTORS slay TRUMP on the SENATE floor , defending the defunct tyrant will be Senator MARCO ANTONIO RUBIO[full name] who like MARCO ANTONIO of ancient Rome seeks to gain the followers of his former master. History always repeats itself.

  12. I would like to propose a hypothesis as to why, in the actual events that Shakespeare was dramatizing, the Roman crowd did, or seemed to do, a complete 180. There is no record of what Antony actually said (although some historians have suggested that maybe Appian's version is more or less accurate), but it has been recorded that the Roman crowd did go, or appear to go, from supporting Brutus, Cassius, and the other conspirators to supporting Antony, and, indeed, rioted and burned down the houses of the conspirators and forced them to flee the city. People have supposed, then, that Antony must have delivered an incredibly brilliant speech (the fact that no reliable record of it exists may have fueled this idea), but also that the Roman public, often derogated as a mob, was constantly shifting in its loyalties, without any thought or consideration; this event has always been exhibit A, if you will, for that portrayal of the Roman public. Certainly, Shakespeare interprets the Roman public that way, in this play and his other Roman plays; see, for example, the "You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things" speech at the beginning. I would like to suggest, though, that there was another reason why the Roman people did such a turnabout: after the assassination, they were afraid. The conspirators had just brutally murdered Caesar on the floor of the Senate and seemed now to be in full control of the city. No one knew where anyone else, except perhaps his closest friends and relatives, stood on the issue. Was the army, up to that point apparently loyal to Caesar, now on the side of the conspirators? If they weren't, why had they not acted to protect Caesar or avenge him? Why had Antony done nothing? People, then, tried to look like enthusiastic supporters of Brutus and Cassius not because they had genuinely turned against Caesar or because they genuinely supported the conspirators, but because they were afraid of them. Then Antony makes a pro-Caesar speech at the funeral. A few of the bravest souls shout their support, and then some more follow their example, and then everyone joins in once they realize that, in fact, there is widespread support for Caesar and widespread opposition to the conspirators. It wasn't that people changed their opinions, at least not their true opinions. It was that people realized it was safe to express and act on their true opinions. I can't prove any of this, of course, but I think it's interesting to consider.

  13. This is honestly the best delivery of this monologue and it needs more attention.

  14. Watch, and mark well, that artists mouths will shape any phrase to perfection, mum any emotion to a t, cast a perfect shade of sincerity . . .

    This chump heston was a first order tRumpet, and if he was breathing, would be lying along with all the rest.

    The lesson for the day is guard your republic against LIARS.

    If someone is a liar, and holds high office, if they lie JUST ONCE . . . and you don't throw them down . . . you are SOLD, brought, parceled and SOLD, you dupes.

  15. Charlton Heston's politics, his tenure as prez of the NRA, & his starring roles in the religious epic movies got him a lot of scorn from Left of Center. But he holds his own with Jason Robards, Gielgud, & the rest. Gonna check out Marlon Brando's Anthony.

  16. Excellent. I was prejudiced about Charlton Heston, and now see his great talent. Excellent in Hamlet (Branaugh) also.

  17. And Anthony weareth a French robe from 1512… OH, What wretched time traveling Caesars do to confound us mortals…

  18. I have always seen Heston as Moses, but I now much prefer him as Mark Antony.

  19. I feel that Heston delivered that speech as Marc Antony better than Brando did. Heston shows so much range, whereas I felt Brando's was emotionally one-note. I feel that Heston had also matured as an actor by the time he played this role, whereas Brando, despite being young yet so very talented, could not outdistance Heston's artistic ripeness that sets apart this delivery.

  20. "I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts! I am no orator, as Brutus is, but as you know me all – a plain, blunt man that loved my friend (…) For I have neither wit nor words nor power of speech to stir men's blood, I only speak right on, I tell you that, which you yourselves do know."

    Oh the old "I'm not a lying, manipulating politician with fancy words, I *only say it like it is!*"-schtick was recognized even in Shakespeare's day.

  21. Honestly never made it through the marlon brando version because I never felt it did any justice.

  22. Romans will never bow anyone it's only indian guys who bow before an roman lady

  23. With diversity rules now the crowd would be half black and anthony would sport an afro haircut.

  24. Soffia dolcemente un venticello
    Spirate nel mio cor
    mia dea Fortuna!
    Sulla volta celeste
    C'è il mare eterno nella mia anima
    Con un sol fulmine
    capirai tal leggenda
    Quando pensi a me, sempre
    bisbiglierò
    Sulla volta celeste
    C'è il mare eterno nella mia anima
    Ovunque tu vada
    Ovunque io vada
    C'è il mio amor nella tua vita
    c'è l'amor nella tua giornata
    Basta un tuo sorriso
    un tuo sol sorriso
    Non morirà l'alma mia. È immortal!
    Non serve versar lacrime

  25. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
    I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
    The evil that men do lives after them;
    The good is oft interred with their bones;
    So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
    Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
    If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
    And grievously hath Caesar answer’d it.
    Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest–
    For Brutus is an honourable man;
    So are they all, all honourable men–
    Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
    He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
    But Brutus says he was ambitious;
    And Brutus is an honourable man.
    He hath brought many captives home to Rome
    Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:
    Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
    When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept:
    Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
    Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
    And Brutus is an honourable man.
    You all did see that on the Lupercal
    I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
    Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?
    Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
    And, sure, he is an honourable man.
    I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
    But here I am to speak what I do know.
    You all did love him once, not without cause:
    What cause withholds you then, to mourn for him?
    O judgment! thou art fled to brutish beasts,
    And men have lost their reason. Bear with me;
    My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
    And I must pause till it come back to me.

  26. We were robbed of James Purefoy giving this speech in HBO's Rome. Absolutely robbed.

  27. A Tyrant, Honorable men who give up reason for COLD STEEL make themselves tyrants. Cold steel was forged to serve Rome not produce mutineers. Mutiny still as wrong on land as it is at sea. Down with all traders! Roman love for Great Cesar. Oh Nobel Cesar we should rid ourselves of the mutiny that plagues our Nation. Free federal private arbors today! Brian Albert Koller

  28. So honorable they stab who they don’t want to have to death, guess hypocrisy runs deep since ancient time lol

  29. Guys I'm beginning to think that Brutus guy is not very honourable… Well that is just me….

  30. "Methinks it is not your place to judge, nor mine." "You thinks?" "Yes, I doth think." "You?" "Yes, I."

  31. William Shakespeare is brilliant. In a matter of minutes he pivots the plot and exposes the opportunists and the populists. A competent Heston does look more worn than 40; interesting to think that Marc Antony goes on to father three more children with Cleopatra and then meet his end. The sets and costumes are Hollywood calendar art at its best, but then so was Raphael.

  32. This is how you convince the sheep of your nation to believe in anything you say, simply repeat the same statements over, and over, and over again. Throw a little charisma and emotion into the speeches, and all of a sudden everything you say is fact.

  33. And where did all the wealth come from that he inherited unto every citizen?
    Oh and what eloquence that non-speaker lacks. Just speaking his mind in regular fancy ways.
    Oh well, … Julius meant well. As a great man, he took the duty of responsibility to conquer. What lack of honor to betray his noble quest for military expansion and subduing of the foolishly uncooperative! Where did that come from? Did he not do anything for the Roman people? Was he not even willing to have others kill for them?

  34. An Ambition, by word that stood against the world. Taking the Honor of Rome to it's full height. What wisdom is of honorable use, [at point of sword] do make Rome fall. Ice Cold the rise and fall of our own ambitions, honors and falling, blasphemy. Ice cold their words and icy hot the power that makes honorable mutiny upon the WISDOM of LEADERSHIP. Power within and the wisdom to lead Rome to Glory has been played by traitors before and after 50 BC. Hail to the Chief even if this business of discredit achieves its goal this leader has done his best. Doing my best is all I have ever wished for in my whole life. Good honest co-operation is what is best for The United States of America. Hail to our Chief and make good co-operation the perfect reason for you own free will choice. Hail President Trump and Family, yours is always best. Honor and Ambition not always seen to be the perfection of leadership. Give up another four years of leadership for Donald Trump. Brian Koller

  35. played marc antoine at school allways loved this speech /very well played being english I find this is one off the best interpriations not a too heavy american accent /ps ps went too rome last year caesar was assasinated in pompies stables they found a plaque you can check it out on the web

  36. This is how I imagine oratory was done in the Latin fora… not in American English, though, but obviously with British accents.

  37. The more I learn about Caesar the more I realize he certainly evolved into an ambitious man. The three times he was presented the crown from Antony was staged and a way of testing the crowd’s reaction. By the point of that event he thought he had enough influence to merit a crown which was a huge gamble requiring overwhelming popular appeal.

  38. Yea, Heston saith true. He naileth it. Who but Charlton Heston could have spoken those lines with the subtlety, restraint, and variety of tone they deserved?

  39. Su vestimenta es renacentista o medieval pero no es romana ni tantito , creo que Heston se ve completamente ESTUPIDO.

  40. "let me not stir you up to mutiny!"
    throws bloody toga over the railing so everyone can see it better
    fuckin lol

  41. "Yes. Well, when I see 5 weirdos dressed in togas stabbing a guy in the middle of the park in full view of 100 people, I shoot the bastards. That's my policy"

  42. Something to note: Caesar was insanely popular among the masses because of his generosity to the common people of Rome.

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