Nobel Peace Laureate Jody Williams / Nobel Women’s Initiative Brent Holland Show



you folks if you're just joining us this afternoon we are honored this afternoon to have as a guest Jody Williams and she giggles this is the type of care to join house by the way very inspirational if you want to be inspired this afternoon you will be indeed stick around Jody Williams of course won the Nobel Peace Prize yeah she's a heavy hitter folks in 1997 for her campaign to Ban Landmines Jody welcome to the show thank you for joining us it's a pleasure to be here are you gonna make music for me absolutely I hear you're a musician composer composer I've composed it the only thing you can't do is cook no I can't sing either music uh-huh I do trust you on that one thank you kindly this show is syndicated across the university network spread over speaking the students right now the idea of the show is to inspire them to inspire the students today to get in there take action you started off virtually as a one-woman show kind of and look what you've accomplished can you take us through that process of the students listening can say now there's a template I can use there's nothing magic about changing the world I've been talking with colleagues in the last couple days about how in today's world there's so much going on so much overwhelming bad news that I think people feel intimidated and disempowered I think that people believe that if they can't make peace happen now there's no use in trying and I think that's an ill-conceived notion although very understandable and I think sometimes I even think that it's purposely done by governments to disempower people to make them really feel overwhelmed with chaos and that they can't do anything do you ever feel frustration yourself that you wanted to happen passionately and yet the time frame takes so darn long maybe when I was younger but not anymore it changed even when you want it is difficult right I'm an introspective person I've been in naval gazing since I could could navel gaze and when I looked at different parts of my personality my sister and I really go at it with each other intellectually about it since we were kids and if there's something I decide that I want to change even that's difficult you know our habits the way we do things are quite ingrained and it's hard so trying to change an entire system of course is that much harder but it doesn't mean it's not possible and I've come to recognize that the speed of change to me is relative to how many people are working together to bring it about and when I say working together I mean getting up off their ass and taking action not just whining about oh my god global warming or oh my God we're gonna be nuked or don't whine at me I don't I don't care about your whining I care that you care about something passionately but then you get up and take action with others to make it different when enough of us do that we can ban nuclear weapons we can change global warming we can even change militarism but it means people working together with a common idea and a common goal and you can make it happen that's what we did with landmines yes I was the first I was the staff of one but I did not change the world by myself nobody does the reason we succeeded in banning landmines was because tens of thousands of people fought just like I did join the campaign in varying ways each contributing what they could and together we moved the world to give up the weapon but it didn't happen by me alone I mean it's really impressive to be introduced as and there's of an individual who challenged of the world I mean that sounds so fantastic it's I did not change the world by myself I'm realistic I think I'm great but you know not that kind of great not like I like Who I am or I wouldn't do what I do but I'm realistic I didn't do it alone do you think that if I could change the world alone I would have just gone after landlines hey Elmo we would have beef you know absolutely folks if you're just joining us for speaking with that incredibly courageous movement courageous woman not only courageous great insight great foresight and a vision for the betterment of mankind now her name is Jody Williams and Joey Williams won the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize yes indeed we are indeed speaking with a Peace Laureate this afternoon and with a great love of Canada because Canada was intimately involved in the land line oh just going to talk about Lloyd Axworthy I love for Boyd I actually had the pleasure of meeting mr. Axworthy several years ago when his book came out in 1996 under then Prime Minister Jean chrétien the Liberal government Lloyd Axworthy became Canada's Minister of Foreign Affairs that's the equivalent of the US government's Secretary of State Axworthy champion the movement to banned landmines and human rights around the world from 1999 through to 2000 Axworthy was president of the United Nations Security Council in 1997 United States Senator Patrick Leahy nominated Axworthy to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work on banning landmines he did not win that year 1997 but the Nobel Prize went to a good friend of his who had worked in tandem with him to Ban Landmines Jody Williams in 1998 Lloyd Axworthy was made an Officer of the Order of Canada sure sure when we started the landmine campaign was back formerly in 1992 and we looked at the tools available to us at that time to bring about change right and there was an existing UN treaty that dealt a little bit with land mines it was terrible what it tried to do was tell military in the field how to use the weapon responsibly it's not possible to use land mines responsibly it's an indiscriminate weapon that stays on the ground after the end of war so how can you responsibly use it you're gone home peace has come and people can be blown up for decades the UN not surprisingly was rather unresponsive to our desire to change that treaty to amend the treaty to a ban it took two and a half years of UN process to make the treaty weaker instead of banning the weapon but in that time the campaign had grown exponentially and we had been able to put pressure on governments individually so that they had taken steps Diana Princess of Wales personally championed the Ottawa treaty and challenged all countries to take part to demonstrate her conviction Princess Diana walked gingerly near a minefield in Angola this brought international attention to the children of the area and to the great cause of banning landmines and ultimately the Ottawa treaty itself for example in March of 1995 Belgium was the first country to unilaterally ban landlines right they passed laws in Belgium saying that nobody could use them produce of export emit cetera that spurred other governments to do the same thing and if you get enough governments taking steps you have the building blocks for change romantic yes and so when the UN process collapsed in our view all of those governments were so pumped about the possibility of change that they came together in a conference hosted in Canada to discuss half a road map to be ending the weapon and it was amazing it was in October of nineteen so ever here in my eye October of ninety-six all state parties to the Ottawa treaty commit to one never use anti-personnel mines nor to develop produce otherwise acquire stockpile retain or transfer them to they agree to destroy mines in their stockpiles within four years of signing number three they agree to clear mined areas in their territory within ten years number four in mine affected countries conduct mine risk education and ensure that mine survivors their families and communities receive comprehensive assistance number five offer assistance to other state parties for example in providing for survivors or contributing to clearance programs number six adopt national implementation measures such as national legislation in order to ensure that the terms of the treaty are upheld in their territory boyd was the host as foreign minister and welcomed the delegates i think there were fifty countries there participating and maybe twenty five as observers the International Committee of the Red Cross was there the landmine campaign it was open participatory so we worked really hard for a couple of days and at the end we had a roadmap to you know lead us eventually to a ban and then late comes back at the end of the meeting to do the formal farewell and he blows everybody out of the water by saying you know something Canada doesn't think this is enough you have come here because you have pledged to Ban Landmines you've been talking about it now for five years the time has come to do it now Canada challenges you to come back to Ottawa in a year's time and sign a mine ban treaty the room what I mean the government's wanted to throw up civil society was like there was crying there was cheering and that launched the year-long process now known as the Ottawa process where governments got together outside the UN and negotiated the mine ban treaty it was absolutely the most amazing thing I've ever been involved in in my life truly was and I think we can use those ideas and bring them forward to today in many many areas yes the Ottawa treaty or officially known as the Convention on the prohibition of the use stockpiling production and transfer of anti-personnel mines and on their destruction bands all anti-personnel land mines around the world the Ottawa treaty conference was held in Ottawa Canada in 1996 today there are 161 state parties to the treaty and 36 United Nations states not party as of today the US has not signed on to the agreement I only have two questions left for you laziness it pisses me off to hear people whine about the world and then go you know drink a beer as they watch the Canucks or who is that sailor team is it so a team I am not engaged in watching team sports but you know don't whine just don't waste your energy take the beer sit in front of the TV and shut the chut shut up it's okay you know University students I know I apologize I promised my mother who just turned 80 that I would not use the f-bomb in public anymore I've gotten way better but occasionally I slip now you know I get really agitated when people just bitch and they don't do anything about it I want to see action you know it people have no trouble spending hours watching television or going to the mall shopping give up a freaking hour and volunteer and change the world it doesn't it's not magic it really is going finding a group of people working on something you really care about offering your time that's all it takes oh yes but whining is not going to change the world that's right folks our guest today Jody Williams the 1997 Nobel Peace Laureate for banning lions just talked about the Canadian connection final question as you know this is primarily for students right across the country in Canada but also around the world because it's on the Internet what would you say I would say if you are really committed to change send me an email and we can talk about what you care about I'm happy to talk with you about finding a group that you want to volunteer with my email is Williams which is myname Williams at AI CBL easy-to-remember International Campaign to Ban Landmines dot o-r-g send me an email tell me where you know that it's from this interview and we can engage in discussion about how you can change the world I think that's perfect in folks of course triple w dot grant Colin show com I will put that link right there for you make it very easy for you just click on it and you contact with our guests afternoon Joey Williams thank you so much let's find all your work now I want to hear your composition so you can't sing thank you so thank you it's fun

2 thoughts on “Nobel Peace Laureate Jody Williams / Nobel Women’s Initiative Brent Holland Show

  1. "If you are really committed to change, send me an email, mention this show and we can talk about how you can change the world!" [email protected] Nobel Peace Laureate Jody Williams 1997
    Jody Williams was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997 for her work toward the banning and clearing of anti-personnel mines
    In November 2004, after discussions with sister Peace Laureates Dr. Shirin Ebadi of Iran and the late Professor Wangari Maathai of Kenya, Williams took the lead in establishing the Nobel Women’s Initiative launched in January 2006; she since has served as its Chair. Through this Initiative, which brings together six of the female Peace Laureates alive today, the women seek to use their access and influence to support and promote the work of women around the world working for peace with justice and equality. (Aung San Suu Kyi is an honorary member.)
    In 1996, Lloyd Axworthy became Canada's Minister of Foreign Affairs (the U.S Government's equivalent of Secretary Of State) under then Prime Minister Jean Chrétien and the Liberal Party Government. Axworthy championed the movement to ban landmines & human rights around the world. From 1999 through to 2000, Axworthy was President of the United Nations Security Council.
    In 1997, United States Senator Patrick Leahy nominated Axworthy to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work on banning land mines. He did not win but that year, 1997, saw Nobel Peace Prize go to Jody Williams who Axworthy had worked in tandem with to ban landmines. In 1998 Lloyd Axworthy was made an officer of the order of Canada.
    The Ottawa Treaty or officially known as the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction, bans all anti-personnel landmines around the world. The Ottawa Treaty Conference was held in Ottawa Canada in 1996.
    Diana, Princess of Wales, personally championed the Ottawa Treaty and challenged all countries to take part. To demonstrate her conviction, Princess Diana, walked gingerly near a minefield in Angola. This brought international attention to the children of the area and to the great cause of banning landmines and ultimately the Ottawa Treaty.
    To date, there are 161 States Parties to the treaty and 36 United Nations states not party. As of today, the US has not signed on to the agreement.
    States Party to the Ottawa Treaty commit to:
    1. never use anti-personnel mines, nor to “develop, produce, otherwise acquire, stockpile, retain or transfer” them;
    2. destroy mines in their stockpiles within four years;
    3. clear mined areas in their territory within 10 years;
    4. in mine-affected countries, conduct mine risk education and ensure that mine survivors, their families and communities receive comprehensive assistance;
    5. offer assistance to other States Parties, for example in providing for survivors or contributing to clearance programs;
    6. adopt national implementation measures (such as national legislation) in order to ensure that the terms of the treaty are upheld in their territory.

    Please share all Night Fright Show videos with your friends. Thanks for being a fan!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *